Dreams Slashed, Dashed in Banksy Stencil

Banksy is probably one of the most obscure famous people in the world: very few know him, but thousands know “of him.” It’s remarkable, really, given the nature and popularity of his art.

This London piece is another powerful example of Banksy’s identity as an artist. Staying true to his characteristic themes—which often include greed, poverty, hypocrisy, despair, and alienation—Banksy depicts a freshly painted “Follow Your Dreams” inspirational message that is promptly crossed out with a big, fat, red “CANCELLED” sign. Reminiscent of “No Smoking” signs, Banksy’s stencil says it all: dreams not allowed. And the poor painter, looking rather stunned to be standing next to his altered art, is subjected to a harsh reality.

NO DREAMS ALLOWED - Another Banksy stencil graffiti, this one dashes the hopes of Brits without a worry in the world.

Imagine if dreams really could be dashed this easily. Like a class, flight, or CW television show, cancelled with the quick slash of a decision made by someone who cares not. Thankfully, in our world of ideals derived from the ever-inspiring American Dream, such a hope-shattering outlook is unlikely.

A British graffiti artist, political activist and painter, Banksy introduced himself to the art scene in the late 1980’s and has since progressed into a prominent artist, political activist, self-published author, and film director. His politically-charged works typically evoke an array of political and social themes, including anti-War, anti-capitalism, anti-imperialism, anti-authoritarianism, anarchism, and nihilism.

Considered a common vandal by some and a closet genius by others, he is no doubt a talented artist. Despite his oftentimes controversial opinions and political views, Banksy produces overwhelmingly creative pieces and deserves to be recognized for the contributions he has made to both the political art and graffiti genres.

One thought on “Dreams Slashed, Dashed in Banksy Stencil

  1. Pingback: FOLLOW YOUR DREAMS | CANCELLED | URBAN ARTefakte

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