Remembered: Martin Luther King Honored Through Political Art

This was supposed to be a post about just one piece of work. I came across this image of Martin Luther King, Jr. with the quote, “Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed,” and I thought the literary aspect added a nice touch—multiple layers and all. The work doesn’t have quite the same significance if the viewer doesn’t understand the origin of the words.

UPLIFTING - This quote from Martin Luther King Jr. was written in the letter he wrote to a priest from Birmingham jail.

This quote is an excerpt from King’s famous Letter from Birmingham City Jail, written on April 16, 1963 in response to a letter he had received from a priest. King was arrested on April 12, 1963 after he violated a court injunction prohibiting the civil rights marches that were taking place in Birmingham, Alabama. When King still continued to lead peaceful marches, he was incarcerated and placed in solitary confinement for eight days. He used toilet paper and the edges of newspaper to write his letter, which was later published as an essay.

In refusing to follow the court order and consequently landing himself in jail, King demonstrated the truth of a principle he lived by: equality comes with struggle. Always.

This is where the post should be ending.

But then, out of curiosity (or maybe some perverse desire to make all my posts exceptionally long this week), I googled “Martin Luther King graffiti” and hit the motherload of political graffiti searches.

Forty-four years following his assassination on April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. is still in the public eye—thanks in large part to the art world. Dr. King has been positively memorialized on the street through numerous graffiti works and murals which honor his memory and mission.

Here’s one in East Harlem: a headshot of King with the word “DREAM” flowing from his brain, recalling the famous “I Have A Dream” speech. 

Another in Chicago shows King alongside President Obama, with the implication that King’s life work and dedication to civil rights for African Americans helped make possible the election of Obama, the United States’ first African American president. 

And this one is my favorite: King releasing the word “DREAM” to be caught by the spirits and minds of two African American children. It’s reminiscent of the classic blow-me-a-kiss game, only this time it’s not kisses being set free, but hopes and aspirations. There’s something very liberating about this piece, seeing the children lit up in this way—like they are feeling the freedom of being unshackled.  

A video of Walter Cronkite announcing Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination to the public: